A Journal About Ranching

Our Cattle Management Practices

Filson: On The Ranch

The Wranglers of Zapata Ranch

Lynx rufa

Daily Journal

An Apprentice’s Story

Nick Baefsky started an apprenticeship on Chico Basin Ranch six years ago, in the fall of 2012. Today he and his wife Amy, another Ranchlands apprenticeship graduate, manage a ranch in New Mexico with the help of three young interns and apprentices. They fix old generators, prop up fences, uncover and splice lines of ancient poly pipe. They gather big brushy pastures by waiting until late in the day when the cows come into water. They keep lists of the vehicles, generators and equipment that needs to be repaired, the pastures that need to be prepared for cattle, the pipeline leaks that need to be fixed. They keep precipitation records and grazing charts that they use to estimate how they’ll move the cattle herds across the ranch through the year.

Ranch Management

Our Cattle Management Practices

At Ranchlands, our cattle program is based on “survival of the fittest.” The ones that raise a good calf every year and breed back are the cattle that make it. We look at a cow’s conformation, fertility, hardiness, disposition, weight, and milk production, but we don’t select for color. Color is not important to our way of thinking. We are in the business of breeding animals that can live, reproduce, and raise a calf in their natural environment. We’ve been managing our herd of Beefmaster-bred cows this way for 15 years, and the result is a herd that is well adapted to it’s environment.